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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    127

    Default

    My daughter has low tone and had a stroke so she has very poor control of her right side. Her sign is absolutely intelligible because she's very consistent, but she definitely has an accent. Some signs got better and more distinct over time. Thank goodness, because it was hard to tell mom, grass, color, dirty, pig, and water apart.

    Really, I think the only probably has been catching her teachers and aides who are learning sign as much or more from her than from other sources because then they sign with her accent.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Stamford, CT
    Posts
    1,200

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alices_dad View Post
    Really, I think the only probably has been catching her teachers and aides who are learning sign as much or more from her than from other sources because then they sign with her accent.
    Steve, I know exactly what you mean... my in laws know about 6 signs between them all, and what the do sign are very inaccurate versions of the proper ASL, but it's because they learn only from each other, and my husband never tries to correct them (because they just go back to the way they do it anyway).

    It;'s tricky with Alice... you would still want her teachers to model or give back the proper clean way (so that Alice always has that model) even though they totally understand what she is communicating.

    Are they aware that they do this? Is it friendly enough for you to suggest they do it the proper/cleaner way?
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    Jen
    mother to three CODAs:
    Henry, 9, Successfully dealing with SPD & ADHD
    Alex, 4
    and Aidan, 2 1/2
    Stamford, CT

  3. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Momx6Blessings View Post
    Now Stephanie also has low muscle tone, which makes signing, particularly finger spelling, more difficult. Anyone with any experience with that?
    Yup! My son, Julian, has very low muscle tone, so TEA and WORK tend to come out the same. He's learning to make sounds as well, though, so I can usually figure out what he's asking for by the context, sound and sign. It does get better though. As he's been practicing his counting, his fingers have become stronger, and while it takes him longer to control each finger, he's getting the hang of it.

    Of import, there are Deaf people with hand-differences, only one hand, whatever, so remember that if she's adapting signs to her abilities, that is totally fine. You model the "correct" sign, but don't give her a hard time about how she's doing it, and she'll improve as much as she is able...I promise!
    Carissa Martos
    Master Signing Time Instructor
    International Associate Director, Northwest Region

    PDX Loves Signing, LLC
    Mother to Rory and Julian (who has craniosynostosis)
    Coordinator for Rachel's Signing Time Concert in Seattle

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Stamford, CT
    Posts
    1,200

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PDX Loves Signing View Post
    so remember that if she's adapting signs to her abilities, that is totally fine. You model the "correct" sign, but don't give her a hard time about how she's doing it, and she'll improve as much as she is able...I promise!
    Exactly!! Well said.

    Communication is the KEY!
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]
    Jen
    mother to three CODAs:
    Henry, 9, Successfully dealing with SPD & ADHD
    Alex, 4
    and Aidan, 2 1/2
    Stamford, CT

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    8

    Default Shaping successive sign approximations to a target

    Hi All,

    Mom to Lulu, 8, developmental delay, hearing, oral/speech/motor apraxia with some dysarthria, complex motor stereotypy, communicates with a repertoire of about 1,000 ASL signs plus vocalizaitons. We have been following a Verbal Behavior program for the past 4 years, which is the only way we were able to teach her so many signs and give her truly functional verbal communication.

    For those with poor motor imitation skills, the point is to "shape" the handshapes over time. That is, to prompt and reinforce successive approximations until either the target is reached or until further shaping is no longer possible.

    For example, the other day, my daughter was playing with a wind-up whale. I was contriving motivations for her to request it with a sign. So rather than just giving it to her or winding it up when she pointed to it, I would play dumb; when I was holding it, I would hold it out of reach and require her to sign for it, etc. The sign was very difficult for her to motor plan, and her initial tries at imitating me were going completely awry - http://www.signingsavvy.com/sign/WHALE/5320/2. She would just cross her arms and hug them to her chest as her attempt to motor plan the sign. So I decided that the initial approximation target was going to be that she ran her finger along the outside of her arm. Getting her to sign that approximation took quite a number of trials, and lots of hand-over-hand prompting -- shaping her index finger to point, running it along her arm -- but it eventually worked and as I faded my prompts each time she tried it, she began to independently make that sign approximation, very proud of herself. The next day, same thing, only this time she quickly got to the approximation level I had set the day before. Now she is using that sign approximation spontaneously and independently with only a few prompts now and again, if her approximation slips. After a while, I will nudge the criteria up a bit to see if she can get even closer to the target handshape. However, I have to always make sure that the response effort is not too high and that I don't require to much of her, because that will weaken her motivation to use the sign, and she will then drop using the sign at all.

    Best,
    Theresa

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